Flash flooding

Columbia County remains under a flash flood watch through Saturday evening, but the National Weather Service in Shreveport has reduced its previous prediction on rainfall amounts.

On Thursday, the weather service was forecasting an additional 2-4 inches of rain through Saturday night. The latest estimate is now 1-2 inches.

The highest amounts will likely be from Deep East Texas eastward across the Toledo Bend Lake and into central Louisiana.

However, the lesser amounts will not mitigate the flash flood risk. Wet soils and full rivers and creeks will make just about any area especially prone to flash flooding, even with lower rainfall amounts.

magnoliareporter.com recorded 2.78 inches of rain from the storm system that passed through Wednesday and Thursday storm, raising the May total to 4.91 inches and 21.29 inches for the year – 16.68 inches has fallen since April 2.

Scattered to numerous showers and thunderstorms will increase across much of East Texas and North Louisiana late tonight.

Scattered to numerous showers and embedded thunderstorms will be ongoing Saturday morning across much of the region with the passage of another upper level disturbance. While isolated strong thunderstorms can not be ruled out over portions of North Central Louisiana and Deep East Texas, brief heavy rainfall will be possible which may result in additional flooding.

The embedded thunderstorms will diminish from west to east

by afternoon. Dry conditions are expected across much of the area Sunday and Monday, but isolated to widely scattered showers and thunderstorms will be possible across East Texas and North Louisiana on Tuesday and Wednesday.

A flood warning has been discontinued for the Little Missouri River at Boughton, but other warnings remain in effect for flooding on waterways across the region. Here’s a look:

Dorcheat Bayou new Springhill, LA.

At 9 a.m. Friday the stage was 14.4 feet. Minor flooding is occurring and minor flooding is forecast. Flood stage is 11.0 feet. The bayou will continue rising to near 16.0 feet by Sunday evening then begin falling. At 18 feet, expect extensive lowland flooding of forestry resources.

Ouachita River at Camden.

At 8:30 a.m. Friday the stage was 33.8 feet. Minor flooding is occurring and moderate flooding is forecast. Flood stage is 26.0 feet. The river will continue rising to near 36.0 feet by Sunday afternoon. Moderate flooding begins at this level. Access roads to commercial, industrial, and residential developments are flooding. Access to locations along the river downstream of Camden, by boat only.

Ouachita River at Thatcher L&D.

At 8:30 a.m. Friday the stage was 86.1 feet. Minor flooding is occurring and moderate flooding is forecast. Flood stage is 79.0 feet. The river will continue rising to near 88.0 feet by Thursday afternoon, May 16. At 88.0 feet, the river is high enough to stop drainage from Calion Lake. Heavy rainfall in the area could cause the lake to rise towards several homes along the shore. Downstream, water rising into undeveloped areas of the State Park at Moro Bay. Widespread flooding of timber, with access to many oil and gas rigs flooded.

Ouachita River at Felsenthal Lock and Dam.

At 8 a.m. Friday the stage was 80.8 feet. Minor flooding is occurring and moderate flooding is forecast. Flood stage is 70.0 feet. The river will continue rising to near 82.5 feet by Monday morning. Additional rises remain possible thereafter. At 83.0 feet, expect long term flooding for several weeks in the Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge. Travel becomes difficult as all access roadways flood.

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